UWA receives $1.25 million to enhance job outlook for graduates

LIVINGSTON, Ala.— The University of West Alabama has just been named one of only 24 colleges in the U.S. to receive a planning grant that will enhance the school’s flourishing workforce development initiative. UWA has received $1.25 million for an initiative to help students gain the knowledge, preparation, insight and skills needed for meaningful employment upon graduation.

Through this multi-phase grant process, the University received in April 2016 a $100k grant award. UWA was one of 30 to receive funding during that phase. Of the 24 schools receiving continued funding, UWA is one of 15 institutions to receive individual awards ranging from $1 million to $1.5 million. According to UNCF, the nationwide total is expected to assist more than 54,000 students.

Funding is provided through a $50 million commitment to the UNCF Career Pathways Initiative by the Lilly Endowment Inc. The program gives necessary support for institutions to employ various strategies to achieve the goal of improving job placement outcomes of graduates by way of aligning curricula with local and national workforce needs, development of intentional career pathway options for students across their collegiate experience, and strengthening career service operations.

“This grant award will greatly enhance the workforce development efforts we have put forth over the last few years,” explained UWA President Ken Tucker. “We have made significant strides in providing quality education that results in a highly-skilled, qualified workforce, with credentials and certificates in hand, ready for the high-paying jobs they deserve.”

At UWA, the funding is being used to create a College to Career (C2C) program designed to enhance current career placement activities to better prepare graduates to transition immediately into the workforce upon graduation. The C2C program provides a comprehensive range of career prep activities including graduating senior career development boot camp, career development mentorship programs, standard career pathways planning courses, individual career staff assistance, and new software and tracking programs to enhance graduate employment tracking.

CPI will serve as a model of best practices for all colleges and universities to follow in order to ensure that the needs of students and the demands of the ever-changing marketplace for talent. The model benefits the American higher education system and the global economy alike.

The initiative is designed to support participating institutions to strengthen career guidance and leverage the liberal arts education of students by adding certain skills, experiences, and knowledge required by employers. Programs are expected to engage college faculty in the development of curricula that is aligned with workforce needs to better prepare students to compete in careers of their choice. The initiative also will help institutions build partnerships with local and national employers and improve student career services.

“I am particularly proud of our grant writing team for their ability to prove through our proposal that UWA is a good fit for this award,” Tucker said. “Like the other grantees, UWA was selected based on our proposal’s reflection that we understand the challenges facing our students as they prepare for post-graduate employment. Our proposal included evidence that UWA actively connects with experts who can help find innovative solutions that benefit everyone involved, but ultimately our geographic region as a whole.”

UWA’s C2C team includes four key players who will guide the success of the program.

Tammy White, director of Career Services at UWA, and Veronica Triplett, director for the Center for Business and Entrepreneurial Services, are C2C’s co-directors. They will oversee the operations of the program, from supervising research, training, and reporting, to implementing activities, developing partnerships, and managing the database.

Danielle Buckalew, director of alumni affairs, and Dr. James Robinson, assistant professor of exercise science, will offer their support as well. Buckalew will act as the alumni relations coordinator, identifying alumni in various career fields and matching them with students in those academic areas for a mentoring program. Robinson will be a liaison between school administrators, faculty members, students, and the C2C steering committee.

Reflecting on established initiatives at UWA to connect graduating students with employers, Tucker said that this grant award will enhance the efforts to produce even more job-ready graduates.

“Through industry partnerships we are positioning our graduates to reap the benefits of having the skills training and capabilities they need to get to work immediately without the typical weeks or even months of on-the-job training they would otherwise need,” Tucker said. “Our industry partners outline to us the skill sets and abilities that they need in an employee, and we are creating the opportunities and courses that will develop those attributes.”

The grant program is supported by the Lilly Endowment, a supporter of UNCF each year since 1944. It is a private philanthropic foundation created in 1937 by the Lilly family through their pharmaceutical business. The Endowment supports the causes of community development, education, and religion. The organization supports efforts of national significance particularly in the field of religion and, on an invitational basis, disaster relief and recovery efforts and programs that enhance higher education opportunities for African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans across the country.

UNCF is the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization. To serve youth, the community, and the nation, UNCF supports students’ education and development through scholarships and other programs, strengthens its 37 member colleges and universities, and advocates for the importance of minority education and college readiness. Today, UNCF supports more than 60,000 students at more than 1,100 colleges and universities across the country.

UWA introduces first cohort of Tutwiler Scholars

The first cohort of the Tutwiler Scholars Program at the University of West Alabama was introduced at the September Board of Trustees meeting. Pictured from left to right, UWA Board of Trustees President Jerry Smith, Sarah Miles, Destiny Langford, Kiersten Schellhammer, Sophia Thompson, Stephanie Metzler, UWA President Ken Tucker, Jade Montgomery, Emylee Tull, Caitlyn Muncher, Anna Holycross, and UWA Provost Tim Edwards. Not pictured: Jack Shiels. (WAW | Contributed)

The first cohort of the Tutwiler Scholars Program at the University of West Alabama was introduced at the September Board of Trustees meeting. Pictured from left to right, UWA Board of Trustees President Jerry Smith, Sarah Miles, Destiny Langford, Kiersten Schellhammer, Sophia Thompson, Stephanie Metzler, UWA President Ken Tucker, Jade Montgomery, Emylee Tull, Caitlyn Muncher, Anna Holycross, and UWA Provost Tim Edwards. Not pictured: Jack Shiels. (WAW | Contributed)

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—The University of West Alabama has announced the first cohort of its Tutwiler Scholars Program, the newest prestige scholarship program at UWA.

The first cohort of Tutwiler Scholars includes six sophomores and five freshmen.

“This program was created to attract, reward, and cultivate truly exceptional undergraduates”, said Dr. Lesa C. Shaul, director of the UWA Honors Program and professor of English. “This program features a 10 member cohort of high-achieving, high-potential students who have demonstrated initiative, creativity, intellectual passion and curiosity, and a commitment to making positive contributions to society.”

The benefits of the program include supplemental scholarships, renewable each fall semester with the maintenance of a 3.5 GPA; a travel stipend for study-abroad semesters; a technology allowance for computers; participation in enriching social, cultural, artistic, and scientific enterprises; and targeted mentoring by UWA professors.

Anna Holycross of Livingston, Ala., is a Tutwiler Scholar. A sophomore biology comprehensive major, Holycross plans to become a veterinarian.

Destiny Langford of Hamilton, Ala., is a Tutwiler Scholar. A sophomore general science education major, Langford plans to teach high school science and eventually become a college professor.

Stephanie Metzler of Oneonta, Ala., is a sophomore Tutwiler Scholar. Metzler, an elementary education major, plans to combine teaching with global outreach and mission work.

Sarah Miles of Irvine, Calif., is a Tutwiler Scholar. A sophomore integrated marketing communications major, Miles plans on using her degree to become a sportswriter.

Jade Montgomery of Livingston, Ala., is a Tutwiler Scholar. Montgomery, a junior majoring in biology comprehensive, plans to become a biomedical engineer.

Caitlyn Muncher of Jasper, Ala., is a freshman Tutwiler Scholar. Muncher, a biology comprehensive major, plans to go into pediatric dentistry.

Kiersten Schellhammmer of Tuscaloosa, Ala., is a sophomore Tutwiler Scholar. Majoring in biology comprehensive, Schellhammer plans to pursue a doctrine in molecular biology or genetics, with the ultimate goal of becoming an animal geneticist.

Jack Shiels of Cheshire, England, is a freshman Tutwiler Scholar. Shiels, interested in the social sciences and business, plans to become a sports psychologist or work in the corporate sector of sports management.

Sophia Thompson of Greenville, S.C., is a Tutwiler Scholar. Thompson, a sophomore majoring in interdisciplinary arts, plans to become a children’s book illustrator.

Emylee Tull of Tuscaloosa, Ala., is a freshman majoring in athletic training. Tull plans to use her degree to become a physical therapist.

Recent UWA graduate presents research in Minneapolis

Randa Simpson, a recent UWA graduate, displays her Honor’s Thesis entitled, “Back that Sexism Up: An Analysis of the Representation of Women’s Bodies in Music Videos,” at the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) conference. (Contributed)

Randa Simpson, a recent UWA graduate, displays her Honor’s Thesis entitled, “Back that Sexism Up: An Analysis of the Representation of Women’s Bodies in Music Videos,” at the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) conference. (Contributed)

LIVINGSTON, Ala.— University of West Alabama graduate Randa Simpson recently traveled to Minneapolis, Minn., to present her Honor’s Thesis entitled, “Back that Sexism Up: An Analysis of the Representation of Women’s Bodies in Music Videos.”

Simpson graduated as an Honors Scholar in May 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Integrated Marketing Communications.

“The University has prepared me to be able to present and defend my thesis on such a level that is unparalleled from any other University,” Simpson said. “The support of my mentors, Dr. Farris, Dr. Jones, Dr. Shaul, and Dr. Davis, was something truly special. They all went above and beyond for me.”

Simpson said that the encouragement she received from these professors played a significant role in her success as a student in the program.

“You can tell that when the professors see the drive within a student to accomplish a goal, they want to fuel that drive and see it through to the finish line in any way they can,” Simpson continued.

A Tuscaloosa, Ala., native, Simpson presented at the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) conference in July 2016.

“Randa worked very hard to complete the requirements for graduating as an Honors Scholar,” said Dr. Amy Jones, academic advisor for Simpson.

“Her thesis was top-notch and earned her a spot in a poster session at a Biennial, International conference,” Jones continued. “She presented her undergraduate research alongside professors and doctoral students, fielding questions and interest from a variety of scholars.”

According to UWA College of Liberal Arts Dean Dr. Mark Davis, Simpson is the product of a successful academic research culture within Integrated Marketing Communications and Sociology programs in the College.

“Through the guidance of professors in Sociology, Integrated Marketing Communications, and the Honors program, Randa produced an amazing research project,” Davis said. “It was no surprise that Randa’s research was accepted for presentation at the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues national bi-annual convention.”

“I am very proud of what Randa accomplished through her research,” Davis continued. “She serves as a shining example to her classmates of what you are able to achieve while studying at UWA.”

Simpson said that UWA provided her with an education and support system that is one-of-a-kind.

“I am a firm believer that I wouldn’t have gotten this attention and care from a larger university, and for that, I am forever thankful for the preparation, encouragement, and experiences that UWA has given me throughout this journey,” Simpson said.

For more information on UWA’s Integrated Marketing Communications program, contact Dr. Amy Jones at ajones@uwa.edu or 205-652-3558.

UWA’s Beaird and Fulton study abroad in Geneva, Switzerland

Whitney Fulton (left) and Kaitlynn Beaird (right), both from the University of West Alabama’s Integrated Marketing Communications program, recently completed a semester studying abroad in Geneva Switzerland at Haute école de gestion de Genève. Beaird, a junior at UWA, is a Dora, Ala., native. Fulton, a senior at UWA, is a Wetumpka, Ala., native. (Contributed)

Whitney Fulton (left) and Kaitlynn Beaird (right), both from the University of West Alabama’s Integrated Marketing Communications program, recently completed a semester studying abroad in Geneva Switzerland at Haute école de gestion de Genève. Beaird, a junior at UWA, is a Dora, Ala., native. Fulton, a senior at UWA, is a Wetumpka, Ala., native. (Contributed)

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—Two students from the University of West Alabama’s Integrated Marketing Communications program recently completed a semester studying abroad in Geneva Switzerland. Kaitlynn Beaird and Whitney Fulton attended Haute école de gestion de Genève (HEG) from Feb.-June 2016 for the spring semester.

“Kaitlynn and Whitney were the first IMC students at UWA to experience a semester abroad. They were able to complete a semester of marketing and communications courses,” said Dr. Amy Jones, academic advisor for both Beaird and Fulton and director of the IMC program.

According to Fulton, a senior at UWA, during her semester in Switzerland she completed 11 classes in international business that will apply to her degree program at UWA in IMC. Fulton said that she is “grateful to have been one of the first IMC students from UWA to study abroad.”

The students both qualified for the experience based upon GPA, and they received a scholarship to assist with the cost of their flights. While abroad, both Beaird and Fulton were able to experience more than just the classroom while in Switzerland.

“The courses were offered during the week, and they spent several weekends traveling around Europe,” Jones said. “This experience should make them highly competitive for jobs, as they successfully navigated a new country, a new language, and a host of international communications courses.”

According to Beaird, a junior at UWA, she and Fulton were able to visit Paris, Rome, Florence, Berlin, Amsterdam, and many other local cities surrounding Switzerland.

“Studying abroad enabled me to see the world in an unimaginable, eye-opening way,” Beaird said. “Without the help and support of UWA’s amazing faculty and staff, I would have never been able to have the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that studying in Geneva, Switzerland offered.”

According to UWA’s College of Liberal Arts Dean Dr. Mark Davis, Beaird and Fulton both represented their major, the College of Liberal Arts, and UWA extremely well during their time in Geneva.

“I’m so proud of Kaitlynn and Whitney,” Davis said. “They took full advantage of the wonderful opportunity to study in one of the most beautiful cities in all of Europe. They can both attest to the rewarding benefits of studying abroad that go well beyond the classroom. They are an inspiration to their fellow classmates, and they should be very proud of what they accomplished.”

To learn more about opportunities available through UWA’s Integrated Marketing Communications program, contact Dr. Amy Jones via email ajones@uwa.edu or call 205-652-3558.

UWA launches new design for collegiate license plate

UWA has launched a new design for its collegiate license plate available to Alabama drivers. Proceeds from sales of the plate benefit the “Tagged for Success” scholarship program.

UWA has launched a new design for its collegiate license plate available to Alabama drivers. Proceeds from sales of the plate benefit the “Tagged for Success” scholarship program.

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—The University of West Alabama has launched a new design for its collegiate license plate. The design features the University’s new branding, including a sleek and fierce red and white tiger profile. Proceeds from sales of the plate benefit a scholarship program at UWA.

The cost of the collegiate plate is an additional $50, of which $48.75 goes into the UWA National Alumni Association’s “Tagged for Success” scholarship to help students succeed at UWA.

According to UWA Alumni Relations Director Danielle Buckalew, the program funds an average of 30-40 scholarships annually. To be considered for a Tagged for Success scholarship, a student must be a junior or senior with a 3.0 or higher GPA.

“Tagged for Success is a great program with two-fold benefits for UWA,” Buckalew explained. “We are able to provide support to students who show promise for success by having reached junior or senior standing with at least a 3.0 GPA with the funds generated through sales. In addition, our supporters, no matter the affiliation, are able to show their support for UWA as they travel with a collegiate license plate.”

Pre-numbered plates are available, or drivers can choose to personalize their inscription with up to six numbers or letters. There is no additional charge for personalization.

Buckalew said that the alumni office enjoys seeing photos from supporters who have personalized their plates with their class year, a college nickname, greek or social affiliations, athletic accomplishments, and more. Some favorites have been the prized classic vehicles that bear the alma mater’s collegiate plate.

A personalization can be reserved for up to five business days using the Alabama Department of Revenue’s Motor Vehicle Title Registration & Insurance Portal, MVTRIP. To begin a reservation, users can access MVTRIP by visiting revenue.alabama.gov, selecting Motor Vehicle under the Divisions tab, then choosing MVTRIP from the E-Services tab. UWA’s plate is listed in the Collegiate category.

UWA’s collegiate license plate is available to Alabama passenger vehicle and motorcycle owners. UWA supporters can get the plate when registering a vehicle or renewing registration at the local tag office in any Alabama county that issues license plates. No additional documentation is required aside from materials required for a standard plate.

Sewell hosts “Congress In Your Community” gathering on UWA campus

Congresswoman Terri A. Sewell, third from right, hosted “Congress in Your Community” on the University of West Alabama campus Tuesday. More than 100 community members greeted her, including, from left, UWA Provost Tim Edwards, Livingston Mayor Tom Tartt, UWA President Ken Tucker, Sumter County District 6 Commissioner Pat Ezell, York Mayor Gena Robbins, and Sumter County Commission Chairman Marcus Campbell. (Contributed Photo)

Congresswoman Terri A. Sewell, third from right, hosted “Congress in Your Community” on the University of West Alabama campus Tuesday. More than 100 community members greeted her, including, from left, UWA Provost Tim Edwards, Livingston Mayor Tom Tartt, UWA President Ken Tucker, Sumter County District 6 Commissioner Pat Ezell, York Mayor Gena Robbins, and Sumter County Commission Chairman Marcus Campbell. (Contributed Photo)

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—Congresswoman Terri A. Sewell, who represents Alabama’s 7th district, hosted a town hall-style event on the University of West Alabama campus on Tuesday. More than 100 members of the Sumter County community attended Sewell’s “Congress In Your Community” gathering at Bell Conference Center on the UWA campus.

Livingston Mayor Tom Tartt brought greetings from the City, thanking Sewell for the support she has shown to Livingston and other rural communities in Alabama.

UWA President Dr. Ken Tucker welcomed Sewell to campus, thanking her in particular for her efforts in support of higher education as an economic growth engine for the Black Belt.

Sewell spoke to the standing room only crowd, providing an update on projects and initiatives that she said focus on helping to further the mission of education, job creation, and community building.

The Congresswoman commended UWA on the school’s efforts in economic and workforce development, as well as seeking grant funding and other support to provide opportunities for students, saying that she draws inspiration from the youth of the area she represents and wants to work in unity to improve the quality of life in Alabama.

Sewell took questions from crowd, addressing healthcare coverage, social security, and education concerns.

UWA to commemorate 100th anniversary of Julia Strudwick Tutwiler’s death

LIVINGSTON—The University of West Alabama will host a special event honoring the 100th anniversary of the death of the University’s library’s namesake, Julia Strudwick Tutwiler, on Sunday, June 12, at 2 p.m.

Ellise Mayor from Birmingham, Ala., will present a portrayal of Tutwiler entitled “My Name is Juila.” A reception will follow Mayor’s presentation.

 The one-woman play was authored by Alabama journalist, photographer, and storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham. Much of Windham’s research for the play was conducted in Livingston, where Tutwiler served as the University’s first president.

Tutwiler served first beginning in 1880 as co-principal of the institution, then named Livingston Female Academy. She became principal in 1888 after the name changed to Alabama Normal College and Livingston Female Academy. Her title was changed to president in 1890, making her Tutwiler the first and only female to have led the University. She served at the helm of the University for a total of 30 years until her retirement in 1910.

Mayor has been steeped in theater all her life. She began teaching creative dramatics at The Birmingham Southern College Conservatory in 1997.

Among other endeavors, Mayor has continued teaching this program with many of her students going on to perform professionally. Currently, Mayor is the artistic director of the Levite Community Center and a teaching artist for ArtPlay, a program of the Alys Stephens Center of University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Mayor is also a guest artist and director at Vulcan Park and Museum and a contributing director at The Birmingham Festival Theater since 2007.

Mayor received her bachelor’s degree, magna cum laude, from The University of Alabama with a major in English literature and a double minor in
theater and German.

A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she has studied five languages. Mayor has received intensive training at the National Shakespeare Conservatory acquiring a Professional Certificate in Theater/Shakespeare. She also excelled at Birmingham Southern College in the master’s program for public and private management, graduating with the top academic average in her class in 2011.

Mayor is a Renaissance woman, a fitting performer to emulate Julia Strudwick Tutwiler because her own passions so often mirror Tutwiler’s. Mayor is especially active in the fields of arts and culture, civil rights and social action, the environment, and human rights.

For more information, please contact Vivian Hauser at 205-652-3611.

BWWMH pumpkin decorating contest

BWWMH held a pumpkin decorating contest among its various departments. Pictured below are a cottage pumpkin that won Best in Show for the Wellness Center.

ET took first place in carved pumpkin and is by Physical Therapy. Billing took second place for carved pumpkin with its Cookie Monster, and the voodoo face won honorable mention for the Wellness Center.
H-best in show H-ET H-Monsters

UWA awarded $2.3 million US Dept. of Education competitive grant

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—The University of West Alabama has just been awarded a U.S. Department of Education Competitive Grant totaling $2.3 million over five years. This is the single largest grant award that UWA has received to date and will be used in the ongoing initiative to improve retention rates.

The funding will be used to develop what University officials have dubbed a “one stop shop” retention center and also initiate a comprehensive program on campus called UWA CARES, the Center for Achievement, Retention, and Enrichment Services. The entire UWA CARES program’s costs are financed by the grant.

“UWA CARES is designed to provide students with access to early intervention strategies that will improve retention and steer them to graduation,” explained UWA President Ken Tucker. “The plan includes centralized advising, faculty and staff and peer mentoring, educational workshops, open study hall with tutoring, state-of-the-art technology, summer leadership camps, and other services and support to assist students in overcoming barriers to achieving their academic goals.”

Since taking office in January of this year, Tucker’s leadership has included a commitment to enhanced recruiting and improved retention. The establishment of UWA CARES, he explained, is a tremendous milestone in the University’s strategic plan.

“Quality educational programs, strong support services, and assistance in maximizing learning opportunities will lead to better retention and graduation rates and to graduates who are more competitive and successful in their chosen careers,” Tucker said.

Angel Jowers, director of Institutional Effectiveness, is the grant author and will serve as program director of UWA CARES. Jowers has worked closely with Institutional Effectiveness staff and UWA’s Office of Sponsored Programs, submitting the grant this past summer.

According  to Jowers, UWA CARES will strengthen the institution’s capacity to serve students from a region that contains 11 of the state’s 56 failing schools as defined by the Alabama Accountability Act of 2013.

“The program will help us identify and target high-need students who are most likely to drop out based upon outlined criteria and provide these students with access to the tools they need to complete a degree program,” Jowers said. “Completing a degree program can improve the overall quality of an individual student’s life as well as over time enhance the workforce and economy of a region.”

By using a student-service-centered approach, the University hopes to provide access to support services and learning opportunities, encourage participation in the available services, and enrich students’ overall campus experience.

“The ultimate goal of UWA CARES is to assist and help motivate students to remain in college until completion of their degree program,” Jowers said.

For more information on UWA CARES, contact Angel Jowers at 205-652-3547 or by email at ajowers@uwa.edu.

UWA launches Second Saturdays series for downtown entertainment

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—The University of West Alabama has announced a new series of entertainment programming set for the fall. “Second Saturdays” will kick off Oct. 10 at 8 p.m. with an acoustic performance by rising star Michael Warren.

Second Saturday events will be held on the courthouse square in downtown Livingston and are open to UWA students as well as the Livingston community. There is no admission to the events. University officials say that the event will enhance programming offered by UWA for its students.

“This is a great opportunity for us to bring some really good entertainment to our students in an area that is convenient for them but also open and accessible to the community,” explained Student Activities Director Jason Gardner. “We strive to offer students programming that they can stay on campus or in town to enjoy, and we think the events we have scheduled so far are ones that they will enjoy on a Saturday night.”

The debut act for the series, Michael Warren, is a singer-songwriter from Hoover, Ala., is pursuing a music career in Los Angeles. Warren began making a name for himself on the Birmingham club scene and now has songwriter credits on songs like Jennifer Lopez’s 2012 hit “Goin’ In,” which featured Flo Rida and Lil Jon and topped Billboard’s Hot Dance Club Songs chart. He has also co-written songs for teen heartthrob Cody Simpson and British boy band JLS.

Warren has released two albums, 2006’s “Michael Warren” and 2007’s “Race to Beat the Sun.” He’s also released two EPs, which have garnered attention from major labels. His latest EP, “Battle” was released this year and is available on iTunes.

In November, Second Saturday will feature a performance by Chris Gladden, a Nashville-based performer whose national introduction was on the hit television series, “The Voice.” He is a multi-instrumentalist, playing guitar, fiddle, mandolin, piano, organ, bass guitar, drums, and dobro. His wide array of music includes country, rock, classical, gospel, bluegrass, jazz, blues, and celtic.

Gladden has shared the stage with artists Darius Rucker, Chase Rice, Morgan Frazier, Elevation Worship, Kim Walker, and John Mark McMillan. He has performed on the Grand Ole Opry’s live show and on ABC’s hit series, “Nashville.”

On Dec. 12, Second Saturday will feature screening of the popular Christmas film, “The Polar Express.” The film will be shown on the square, and viewers are encouraged to bring blankets or lawn chairs for a relaxing movie night.

University Cinema’s snack bar and restrooms will be open to Second Saturday-goers.
For more information on UWA’s Second Saturday series, contact Jason Gardner in the Student Activities office at 205-652-3624.