Demopolis, Linden schools, MA closed Monday due to weather threat

Demopolis City Schools Superintendent Kyle Kalhoff decided just before 8:45 p.m. Sunday night to reverse an earlier decision regarding Monday classes. With systems around the state closely monitoring Hurricane Irma on its trek through Florida and Gov. Kay Ivey having declared a state of emergency, Demopolis City Schools will be closed.

“I’m reversing my decision from earlier,” Kalhoff said. “We will make a decision about Tuesday (classes) tomorrow.”

Superintendent Dr. Timothy Thurman notified The West Alabama Watchman at 9:05 p.m. Sunday that Linden City Schools will be closed Monday with a tentative plan to reopen Tuesday. Marengo Academy issued its notification a little after 9 p.m. that it will also be closed Monday.

Superintendent Luke Hallmark indicated that Marengo County Schools will be open Monday.

Other closings include West Alabama Christian, Bright Beginnings Daycare (Demopolis), First Baptist Church WEE School (Demopolis), Tender Years (Demopolis), and Shelton State Community College (Demopolis).

Demopolis BOE holds first meeting of new academic year

Praising Demopolis City Schools for an “extremely smooth start,” School Supt. Kyle Kallhoff said it was the best he has experienced in his 20 years in education.

At the Board of Education meeting Monday, Kallhoff said the work on the buildings and the efforts by the teachers and administrators were reflected in the ease back into the school year for the system’s 2,300 students.

He showed the board a three-minute video of the first day of school at all four campuses.

The superintendent told board members the system is fully staffed with the exception of a nine-month custodian at Demopolis High School.

That said, the board still had work to do to complete the start-up for the 2017-2018 year, beginning with the need to advertise for a part-tiime LPN for Demopolis Middle School.

The 20-hour per week position is needed, Kallhoff said, because the health needs of the students have grown. The RN at the high school cannot divide her time among schools because of the increased number of students with diabetes at DHS.

Evelyn James, the CFO of the school system, said revenues are up by $883,000 over the same time in 2016, while expenses have decreased by $29,000. She said the system has 3.11 months of revenue in reserve. The state Board of Education requires a minimum of one month.

Her report was followed by the state auditor, Emily Tyler, reporting no problems found in the audit done for the 2015-2016 year.

To keep revenue flowing into the school system, the board approved a resolution presented by Kallhoff to petition the Marengo County Commission to consider a renewal of a three mill tax for District 2, which includes the city of Demopolis. The tax requires voter approval for renewal every 10 years. He asked members of the board to attend the Sept. 12 meeting of the Commission when he presents the request for the tax renewal.

First readings were held for two board policy changes, both required by the Alabama legislature. The first, the Jason Flatt Act, involves youth suicide awareness and prevention. It calls for employees to receive annual training to identify characteristics of students who may be considering suicide.

The Religious Liberties policy requires that there will be no discrimination of students or their parents for religious beliefs. A public hearing for both policies will be held Thursday, Sept. 7, beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Also approved by the board was a lease agreement with TEQlease for Impero Computer Monitoring Software. Kallhoff said the five-year lease, at $5,000 per year, would serve the school system in three ways:

First, it would allow the monitoring computers to restrict use to certain websites, preventing users from visiting inappropriate sites. Second would be a time-saving feature, allowing IT to install programs in multiple computers from one base unit instead of having to install programs individually.

The third feature allows those monitoring the use of school computers to flag any words or searches that could pose any dangers.

In other action the board approved:

  • The Equipment Financing Agreement with Government Capital Corporation for the Active Panel Promethian installation project.
  • Renewal of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Demopolis Police Department for two School Resource Officers. The school system will pay half their salaries.
  • A hold harmless agreement with the DPD for the use of the DMS football field for National Night Out on Sept. 12.
  • Contract for Susan Hollinger to provide psychometrist services to administer testing for special education and gifted students.
  • Overnight and/or out-of-state trips for the DHS cross country team Sept. 16 and Sept. 30 to Meridian, Miss., and Nov. 10-11 to Moulton.

Personnel matters included:

  • Hiring Rebecca Hasty as bookkeeper at DMS.
  • Substitute hiring of Annie Collins and Betsy Stephens.
  • Head tennis coach changed from Sam Mosley to Dana Hill.
  • Maternity leave request for Whitney Mosley, USJ, to begin Feb. 18, 2018.
  • Maternity leave request for Kristi Stokes, USJ, to begin Jan. 3, 2018.
  • Family medical leave request for Tammi Western-Scott, DMS teacher.
  • Katrina Sprinkle as long-term substitute for Western-Scott.
  • Rodney Lewis as DMS assistant football coach for supplement of $1,189.
  • Norvie Womack as DMS athletic director for supplement of $1,400.
  • Name correction from Aug. 2 personnel report from Javalynn Williams to Javalynn Wilson Henderson.
  • In a special called meeting Wednesday, Aug. 2, the board accepted the resignation of Annette Gwin, the DHS culinary arts instructor. Gwin had been a teacher in the system for 16 years.

The superintendent set public hearings for the 2017-2018 budget For Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. and Sept. 11 at 4:30 p.m., followed by a called meeting at 5 p.m. to approve the budget.

He also invited board members to attend a ribbon-cutting ceremony Sept. 15 at 9 a.m. for the new Pre-K program at Westside Elementary School.

At the same time there will be dedication of wooden planter boxes. The brainchild of a UWA student, the boxes were constructed by Cemex employees. Three have been placed at all four campuses.

The next regularly scheduled board meeting will be Monday, Sept. 18, at 5:15 p.m.

Robertson Bank gives surprise gift to four DCS employees

Robertson Banking Company’s Katie Windham and Allen Bishop were on hand at Demopolis City Schools’ Institute Friday to present a $100 to a staff member of each of the four DCS campuses.

Demopolis test scores trend positive though ACT Aspire results questioned by state

Test scores taken last spring in Demopolis City Schools show terrific gains in some areas and challenges in others.

Results of the ACT Aspire, ACT and AP course tests were to be shared at the Teacher Institute Friday prior to the start of the new school year.

“There hasn’t been a lot of bragging in the past few years,” said Supt. Kyle Kallhoff, but after the results of the tests in the spring, “I immediately went out and bought five pizzas” to celebrate with students and teachers.

However, the ACT Aspire scores are being called into question by several school systems in the state who reported large flaws in the details of the test results. Kallhoff attended a meeting in Montgomery August 4 in which concerns about the test were aired with DOE officials. The DOE will be reviewing the results – including those in Demopolis – within the next several weeks.

Kallhoff said the ACT Aspire test, administered to students in grades 3-8, will be replaced for the 2017-2018 year with Scantron while the state Board of Education decides on another standardized test to monitor progress.

So far the DOE hasn’t given superintendents a lot of input on the interim test and has yet to issue guidelines for using it, leaving school systems scrambling to determine how to administer it this fall and evaluate the results.

The new test is supposed to show teachers the readiness data of their students so they can adjust instruction accordingly.

“If it were up to me, I would use (ACT Aspire) one more year,” said Kallhoff, even though he feels the test “is not good for everybody.”

ACT Aspire aligns with the ACT test given to every junior in Alabama. The test assesses a student’s progress to be ready for college and covers reading, English, math, science and writing.

The problem, said Kallhoff, is that not every student will go on to college or technical training after high school.

Still, Kallhoff was pleased with several results, which also was a reflection of the emphasis placed on different subjects. For instance, he said, 19 percent of the DHS juniors tested at or above the benchmark score for mathematics on the ACT, an indication they would make an A or B in a college algebra course. That is the highest percentage ever for DHS.

Scores showed professional development for teachers have a great impact on students taking the ACT Aspire. A full 69 percent of students in 6th grade scored proficiently on writing, a jump from only 5 percent when those students were in fifth grade.

A similar, although less dramatic increase, was shown in 5th grade students over their scores in 4th grade, from 9 to 40 percent.

The 6th grade math scores rose three points to 57 percent. All other grades stayed the same or showed a decrease over the previous year of anywhere between 5 and 22 percentage points.

Middle school math is always a challenge, said Kallhoff.

Fifth grade reading scores on the ACT Aspire jumped to 44 percent of students ready or exceeding the benchmark, reflecting the professional development teachers received. The scores have risen over the last three years.

Eighth grade reading scores also rose to 38 percent, a rise of 8 points. The other grades slipped slightly or stayed the same over the previous years.

In reading, science and English, classes mostly held their own from one year to the next. The biggest decline was 4th grade English which slipped by 16 percentage points, and the biggest gain was in 8th grade science scores that jumped by 6 percent.

The ACT test is given to all high school juniors in the fall. Those who want to improve their scores can opt to take it again on their own.

The ACT test sets benchmark scores in four subjects: English, math, reading and science. After a dip last year, DHS juniors came roaring back last spring with some of the best scores ever, including the aforementioned math.

In English, 53 percent taking the test met or exceeded the benchmark, a jump from 40 percent the previous year. Math was up from 12 percent; reading climbed to 28 from 22 percent, and science showed the biggest gain to 20 percent from 8 percent in 2015-2016.

What pleased Kallhoff is that 11 percent of the juniors who took the test met the benchmark scores in all four subject areas, an increase over 3 percent the previous year.

Advanced Placement courses are offered at DHS for students who need extra challenge in certain subjects or who want to receive college credit before enrolling.

Each student can take more than one AP exam at the end of the year, depending on how many AP courses he is taking. This year 328 tests were administered. Of those, 58 percent ranked in the extremely well qualified level, which almost ensures students of receiving college credit. Another 38 percent ranked well qualified, which usually is considered credit-worthy by colleges, and 19 percent scored on the qualified level, which may or may not be accepted.

The superintendent, now beginning his third year, said he is excited “where we are with our principals.” With the addition of Brandon Kiser at DMS and Blaine Hathcock moving to DHS, he believes the school system is building a solid foundation for the future.

“Things are right now where they need to be.”

DCS board makes last-minute moves before 17-18 school year

In a flurry of votes Wednesday morning, the Demopolis City Board of Education approved personnel changes and several contracts before the new school year begins.

Conditional employment approval was granted to:

  • Kelly Easter, U.S. Jones Elementary.
  • Rodney Lewis, JROTC NCO at Demopolis High School.
  • Javalynn Williams, Demopolis Middle School.
  • Timothy “Cain” Sutton, DMS.
  • Traci Spiller, Central Office administrative assistant.

The board accepted resignations from Nicole Jensen at DMS and Nicole Greene at USJ.

Substitute teachers approved were Tamyla James, Carrie Williams and Sherri Peterson.

Miscellaneous personnel changes included:

  • Michael McClain, Family Medical Leave.
  • George Mullens, substitute in the USJ lunchroom for McClain.
  • Carrie Williams as a long-term sub at DHS.
  • Andrea Turberville from adjunct teacher to part-time teacher at DHS.
  • Jesse Bell, DMS assistant football coaching supplement: $1,189, and DMS head basketball coaching supplement, $1,901, was approved on a 4-1 vote with Jim Stanford voting no.

Remington Keene received a one-year contract as an adjunct teacher at DHS to teach three Spanish classes per day. The board renewed Susan Clark’s one-year contract for speech services and that of Genesis Rehabilitation to provide physical and occupational therapy.

In other action, the board approved:

  • An agreement with the website management company “edlio” to provide services for the school system. Supt. Kyle Kallhoff explained the current website is much better than several years ago, but there is a push to have it more user friendly for teachers. The initial start-up cost will be higher, but the annual cost will be about $500 less than the company now being used.
  • An agreement with WSLY-FM radio to provide live coverage of the DHS football games.
  • A contract with Centerplate of the University of Alabama and the DHS Band to allow band members to work the concession stands at UA home football games as a fundraiser.
  • Advertising for a 12-month bookkeeper position at DMS.
  • A finance agreement with John Deere and DHS to make two annual payments on a new Gator, a general utility vehicle. Board member Olen Kerby said the vehicle that is being replaced should have lasted longer. He asked that someone be put in charge of the new vehicle’s maintenance.

Kalhoff said budget hearings will be scheduled between now and the deadline for approval on Sept. 15. The next regularly scheduled board meeting is Monday, Aug. 21, at 5:15 p.mn.

Demopolis BOE readies for new academic year in Monday meeting

Back-to-school preparations took up much of the Demopolis City Board of Education meeting Monday.

Board members voted on personnel changes, bids for services and other actions to get ready for the school year that starts in less than a month.

One of the actions taken was to approve an on-site counselor from West Alabama Mental Health to be at Demopolis Middle School to serve WAMH clients. The board pays nothing for the counselor but will provide an office, internet connection and phone in the library.

In addition to working with the WAMH clients, the counselor will also serve as a resource to the school counselor, said Kyle Kallhoff, superintendent. If the program works well this first year, it may be expanded to U.S. Jones or Westside Elementary Schools in 2018-2019.

Parents who want to pay on line for their child’s school lunch now use PayPams. The board voted to expand the service to allow parents to pay school fees on line as well.

However, the original motion was modified to make sure PayPams lowers its service fee as the school year progresses and the amount declines.

The Child Nutrition Program (CNP) bids approved included Four Seasons Produce, $23,783.11; Borden Dairy, $83,769.01, and Ice Cream Warehouse, $11,170.

In other action the board approved:

  • An agreement with Shelton State Community College for the dual enrollment HVAC class.
  • Extra-curricula supplements.
  • Inventory disposition of four items, including a 1998 bus that will be offered for sale.

In consent items, the board voted for:

  • A memorandum of understanding to implement in the new pre-K program
  • A contract with Fleming Photography to take Demopolis High School pictures, including senior portraits, class photos and sports.
  • Re-advertising the Central Office secretary position and expand it to 10 months with a commiserate salary.
  • Advertising for a DMS English teacher.
  • Rotary Club dues for the superintendent.

The personnel report included the following:

  • Employment: Mary Ellen McCrory, CNP worker at WES; Nicole Jensen, Social Studies teacher at DMS; Tracey Stewart, 10-month assistant principal, split between WES and USJ; Jamie Webb, USJ teacher, and William Jackson, 12-month custodian at WES.
  • Resignations: Pam Morrison, Central Office secretary, and Allison Cobb, English/Language Arts teacher at DMS.
  • Transfers: Shawn Nikki Cobb, Special Education paraprofessional from USJ to DMS, and Ricky Richardson, Special Education paraprofessional from USJ to WES
  • Substitutes: Elaine Carter and Katie Poole
  • Miscellaneous: Brandi Dannelly, DHS girls P.E. teacher to a 10-month employee, and Norvie Womack, Career Prep teacher at DMS, to a 10-month employee.

Kallhoff gave the board a brief overview of the ACT, ACT Aspire and AP exam results for 2017, which will be shared with personnel at the Teacher’s Institute.

The board will hold a called meeting at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, to make final personnel changes. The next regularly scheduled meeting of the board will be Monday, Aug. 21, at 5:15 p.m.

Demopolis BOE hires five in Thursday meeting

The Demopolis City Schools Board of Education made five hires Thursday morning during a brief called meeting. The personnel moves are as follows:

  • Hired Rachel White as English/Language Arts Teacher at Demopolis High School
  • Hired Brandi Dannelly as girls Physical Education Teacher at Demopolis High School
  • Hired Aubrey McElroy as Science Teacher at Demopolis Middle School
  • Hired Ieasha Morris as Lunchroom Worker at Westside Elementary School
  • Hired Norvie Womack as Career Prep Teacher at Demopolis Middle School.

Womack will assume varsity boys basketball head coaching duties. Additionally, the board voted to move Virginia Goodlett to a 12-month assistant principals position at Demopolis High School. Goodlett spent the previous academic year as an assistant principal at both Westside and U.S. Jones.

“She can hit the ground running. She has been in the high school. She knows the high school,” Demopolis City Schools Superintendent Kyle Kallhoff said of the logical fit that places Goodlett under the direction of DHS Principal Blaine Hathcock. “That’s what Mr. Hathcock needs. He needs someone to come in and hit the ground running. She is going to work with instruction. She’s going to work with the upperclassmen and do more with instruction. She knows the teachers there. She knows the staff. She is just going to compliment Mr. Hathcock and Mr. Pittman well.”

Goodlett’s return to DHS also puts the school back near its full administrative strength after it carried only one assistant principals for the 2016-2017 school year.

“Traditionally (the second assistant principal position at DHS) has been there. We did not have it there last year, but we are putting it back this year. Our numbers are going to be up a little bit,” Kallhoff said. “You know, 750 is that magic number where you want to have that second administrator. I don’t know that we’ll get to 750, but we’re going to be very close to 750 at the high school. We lost a small senior class and I think there’s a 50 student difference in our freshman class that’s coming up.”

In a corresponding move, the board will post the split assistant principal spot that Goodlett is vacating in her return to the high school. The elementary assistant principal position will be posted for 14 days and should be filled at the July 17 board meeting.

“I feel very good. The principals know what their needs are at their schools. We’re still lucky to have quite a few applicants, especially at our elementary level. It’s difficult to fill some of the math and science openings or special ed, but we haven’t had many of those this summer,” Kallhoff said of where the system stands with only six weeks until teachers report for Institute. “I feel good. We’re bringing our staffs together. There’s just a few small little openings that are left, but we’ve got another month where I think we can get those gaps filled.”

The board also approved the school system’s Foster Care Plan, a protocol that satisfies the state mandate of accommodating students in foster homes.

“It is due during the summer. They want to know what your plan is and how you’re going to accommodate foster care students within your system. Last year we had seven. This year we anticipate nine. You want to make sure you remove any barriers,” Kallhoff explained. “Of course you want to remove barriers for any student, but you certainly want to remove barriers for foster care students who have had challenges they’ve had to go through already in their young lives. You want to make sure their school life is as smooth as it can be.”

As part of that plan, Demopolis High will partner with the Marengo County office of the Department of Human Resources to afford students in foster care every possible resource.

“It talks about the partnership with DHR, removing any barriers as far as lunch status, and just make sure they’re comfortable and things are going well in school,” Kallhoff said. “Dawn Hewitt is our go-to person. It’s communication. It’s her knowing that she has a direct line to Gina Johnston, our principals, our counselors, me. When they have a student they’re having to deal with for whatever reason, they’re not having to go through red tape and we’re making sure we can identify that child that particular school day and just make things as smooth as possible for that child.”

Graduation date change among Demopolis BOE moves

Demopolis City Schools, starting with Westside Elementary, will begin implementing the program “Leader in Me” to teach 21st century leadership and life skills to students.

The Board of Education approved the program, developed by Franklin Covey of the “7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” at its meeting Thursday morning.

Title I professional development funds will be used to pay for the initial year of training for every adult at WES. The cost is $41,343 for the first year and $16,500 for years two and three, said Supt. Kyle Kallhoff.

The program will extend to U.S. Jones Elementary the second year and eventually to Demopolis Middle School, he said.

The idea behind “Leader in Me” is that every child can be a leader. As the student develops, he also acquires responsibility, problem solving, teamwork and creativity, among other traits.

The board also approved Anderson Plumbing and Heating to do emergency repairs and maintenance work on the HVAC system recently installed in the high school.

No cost of the work could be set since the extent of the repairs and what is required for the job is not known.

After the meeting, Kallhoff said that while the new system works, “At the end of the day it’s got to work properly.”

He said some of the companies involved in the installation have gone out of business, and litigation is expected for the school system to receive reimbursement for whatever costs are incurred.

The board voted to move the date of graduation from May 25 to May 18, 2018. Kallhoff said it was being done for two reasons: to move the ceremony out of the last week of school and to keep it from being over the Memorial Day weekend.

Sharing enrollment projections for the next year, Kallhoff told board members that several Sumter County parents have called to ask about transferring their children to Demopolis schools.

He said there is room to accept more children and invited Sumter parents to meet with principals and visit the schools.

Ricky Montz, whose daughter plays softball for the high school, had at first approached the board about the locks being changed on the softball field. When he understood that the school system is liable for any injury incurred if there is no board employee on site, he said he understood.

Kallhoff said only three people have keys to the field now. He told the board it will have to take up the matter of limiting access to other school athletic facilities because of liability, especially since the system is getting ready to invest another $5,000 for upgrades to the track.

In other action, the board approved:

  • The purchase of a 2013 72-passenger school bus for $60,000.
  • Disposition of items no longer usable.
  • Travel for Kallhoff to attend several conferences and training sessions in June and July.
  • Out-of-state travel for the USJ 21st Century Camp in Meridian, Miss.

The following personnel hires were approved:

  • Darius Waters, WES custodian
  • Eric Hendricks, PE teacher at WES
  • Sierra Allen-Galusha, special education teacher at WES
  • Kamie Johnson, First Class Pre-K Grant Lead Teacher at WES
  • Claire Bell, First Class Pre-K Grant Auxiliary Teacher at WES.

Also approved were two transfers: Brian Allen, English teacher, and Robert Wilkerson, Social Studies teacher, both from DHS to DMS.

Kallhoff called a special meeting for June 29 at 9 a.m. for action on new basketball and softball coaches for the high school. The next regularly scheduled board meeting will be July 17 at 5:15 p.m.

Credit union branch proposed at Demopolis High; retirees honored in Monday meeting

Four of seven retirees were present at Monday’s BOE meeting, including, from left, Katie Poole, Paula Bond, Lori Giles, and Tammy Spruell. (WAW | Jan McDonald)

Opening a branch of Naheola Credit Union at Demopolis High School and having students earn credit for operating it was proposed to the Demopolis City Board of Education at a called meeting Monday.

Under the proposal, the pilot program would start in the fall and be part of the Finance Academy, under the direction of Kelly Gandy. Students would earn a credit hour for taking it, explained Ashley Coplin, marketing director for the credit union.

“It lines up perfect with the state standards,” added Gandy.

Up to four seniors would be operating the credit union branch two days a week from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., if the proposal is accepted. Students would be interviewed by credit union personnel before being hired.

Gandy said that while it would benefit her students, she is pleased with the impact it will have on the rest of the student body by helping them understand finances.

The credit union would be part of a classroom course open to all students at the high school, Gandy continued.

Coplin reviewed the duties and responsibilities of both the students and Naheola Credit Union. She stressed that the credit union would absorb all costs for setting up and operating the facility as well as safety features. All DHS would need to provide is the space.

To that Gandy added that principal Blaine Hathcock already has designated an area that can be used.

Board members and Supt. Kyle Kallhoff asked several questions about how the course would be conducted. No action was taken.

The board honored seven retirees who have contributed 168.5 combined years in the Demopolis school system.

Retirees attending the meeting were Lori Giles, 29 years; Paula Bond, 11; Tammy Spruell, 30, and Katie Poole, 11. Not in attendance were Julie Lee, 28.5 years; Cynthia Whitlock, 25, and Poncho Robinson, 30.

In other personnel matters, the board approved the following:

  • Conditional employment: Robert Wilkerson, DHS history; Matthew Mellown, DHS special education; Lindsey Thorne, Crystal Freeman and Nicholas Seymore, Westside Elementary; Clint Humphrey, DHS paraprofessional, and Kristina Kallhoff, U.S. Jones Elementary.
  • Resignation: Elaine Calvin, USJ; Brittany Dunson, DHS physical education; Ashley Allen, Demopolis Middle School business and marketing; Lincoln Luker, WES physical education, and Andrew Luker, DHS history teacher.
  • Tamyla James was granted a substitute teacher license.
  • William Jackson, WES lunchroom worker, will be employed as a temporary custodian throughout the summer.

In the only other action, the board approved a contract with Michael Randall to provide ground maintenance to all campuses.

The board next will meet on Thursday, June 1, from 2-4 p.m. for a work session.

End of year actions occupy Monday BOE meeting

End-of-year actions took up most of the Demopolis City Board of Education meeting Monday, including personnel matters and summer construction work.

Charles Jones Construction received the bid for concrete and awning work at Demopolis Middle and U.S. Jones Elementary schools for a total of $57,694.39. This is the second phase of capital improvements started last year.

The work at DMS will include installing a sidewalk and awning from the east side of the building to Cherry Street for $30,308.49, and repairing a sidewalk and installing an awning on the west side of USJ parallel with South Front Avenue, for a cost of $27,385.90.

Also approved was a contract with Interquest Detection Canines for drug searches at DMS and Demopolis High at $600 per visit. Supt. Kyle Kallhoff said four searches are planned for the next school year.

The board accepted the state audit of the school system’s finances for Oct. 1, 2014 through Sept. 30, 2015, given by Cindy Wilson with the Department of Public Accounts.

The board eliminated two positions in the school system: the physical education paraprofessional at DHS and the gifted paraprofessional.

The board accepted the personnel report, which included:

  • Conditional Employment: Adam Brown as DMS band director and assistant director at DHS; Lisa Lindy as Media Specialist at DHS, and Pam Morrison as Central Office secretary.
  • Resignations: Jessica Dial, Central Office secretary; Logan Colvin, DHS history teacher; Herbert Rice, DMS history teacher, and Carly Mosley, DMS English teacher.
  • Transfers: Charlotte Anne Johnson, from Special Education teacher at DHS to USJ; Amanda Smith, from math teacher at DHS to DMS; Emily Low, PE paraprofessional at DHS to WES; Carrie Goodman, DMS math teacher to DHS, and Meggin Mayben, DMS history/broadcasting teacher to history teacher at DHS.
  • Andrea Johnson, WES first grade teacher, is being reassigned to Library/Media Specialist at WES.

In other action, the board approved:

  • Disposal of used equipment that cannot be repaired
  • Bidding on a used school bus
  • Out-of-state field trip for qualified DHS students to attend the national FBLA convention in Anaheim, Calif., June 27-July 3.

The board will have a called meeting Monday, May 22, at 4 p.m. and its mandatory Whole Board Training is scheduled for June 1 from 2-4 p.m.